Consuming Cyberspace: Leadership Journal

Consuming Jesus was recently listed in the fall 2008 issue of Leadership Journal (leadershipjournal.net) as part of its Golden Canon–the top 10 books of 2008.  Also featured in the journal is a great review of Consuming Jesus by David Swanson (who has contributed his story as part of this blog).  Be sure to look for it in the most recent Leadership Journal.  In addition, Out of Ur, the official blog of Leadership Journal, just posted this audio interview of Dr. Metzger by David Swanson.

3 Responses to “Consuming Cyberspace: Leadership Journal”

  1. Ben Malick Says:

    Thanks for this post. After listening to the short audio interview I felt really inspired to share a quick thought. In it Dr.Metzger unpacks the issue of “Stability and security having the potential to become diabolical and idolatrous.” I’ve been humbled more and more through the conviction of the question, “What do I find my security in?” While I’m compelled by Christ’s love to be about the mission of Kingdom restoration, it seems ridiculous to me how often I disconnect from that same love, inorder to keep “MY” mission moving forward. Why do I compromise Christ’s love for my work? My only answer seems to point to where my true security is coming from… and that just makes my soul ache.

  2. Rachel O'Brien Says:

    Thanks Ben for your commment. I agree that even at this small stage in my “ministry” I often function as though people and the gospel in them are a means to an end rather than “… an end in itself” I think too I need to listen to myself, listen to the things that I claim and hold and adhere to and remind myself, that even as I guide others, even as we grow into leaders of this strange sort of jumbled community we know as Christianity, our voice cannot become dead in our own ears. While I profess great love, great sacrfice am I willing to hear, know, and do what I lead others to? I pray for each of us a naivete that is oddly wise, in that we continue to disregard the pull toward safety and security and even the acquisition of power in our circles and continue to live like little children. While the church functions to create disciples may it never become a set of functions. That we would continue, and in some cases begin, to turn to the Father and not the “functions” of our faith.

  3. Casual Observer Says:

    I am intrigued by your bafflement. I am serious. You made no sense Rachel. The gift you claim must be honed. If you want to preach, be prepared to fear the book you teach. It is truly powerful.

    c/o

    PS – not preaching here…

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